Linux Gaming & VR


#21

Haha, well i suppose i should say i use the 18.04 repos more accurately :slight_smile:
I generally just install a base system and then openbox + whatever i need.
Of course, over the course of the last 7-8 years, my number of packages installed has ballooned to 1656 :frowning:
I look through them every once in a while trying to get rid of some and then realize I use most of them.

My first Linux experience was with Puppy Linux and fluxbox as my window manager on a PS3, good times but rather slow.

I probably need to give pacman another try. I really liked arch linux (had a functional GUI environment at 24MB of ram), but pacman itself felt kinda weird.

Other than that,
Debian
OpenSuse
Kubuntu
Lubuntu
Mint
and I think my oldest laptop uses slackware, but im a bit too lazy to boot it up (Pentium 3)

Debian spinoffs always seemed to have really straightforward package management systems which was nice.


#22

I definitely like the ice creakm approach of linux. I do like the rise of container programs. Though have had some trouble getting Stremio to play nice.


#23

I like the ability to continually upgrade your system without having to do a clean install.
My main system started life on a laptop with a broken screen and a 250G HDD as Ubuntu…8.10 i believe and 32 bit.
It now exists on an SSD with data and miscellaneous on a 4x3TB Raidz2 array and yes, did an in place upgrade to 64 bit.

I love that i can keep any and all of my configuration and just upgrade to the next generation packages. Want to install a new motherboard? You just do it and it works, no issues with Windows squawking. Also good because I can never remember all of the custom settings I’ve put in place :slight_smile:

Only issues I’ve ever had are with Nvidia and my LAMP stack (which luckily I don’t have to deal with anymore)

Perhaps best summarized as Linux, the ability to do terrible things regardless of if it is a good idea, haha


#24

Indeed love the ease of change. Have simply pulled the os drive & inserted into a completely different computer.


#25

Yup. I have this dream that one day all of my operating systems will be run off of a single ZFS array on a single set of hardware that can be replaced completely at whim.
When upgrading I’ll just do a snapshot, and if the upgrade fails, switch to another distro and execute a rollback on the failed distro immediately getting it back to a working state.
When people come over, run a script to fire up a VM (for each person) for them to game on.
Of course, I’ll probably have to wait for cheap enough SSDs to come out to pull the last one off :slight_smile: Maybe buy more screens as well.

As an additional followup on getting X (Whatever) game running on Linux,
Proton makes everything sooo much easier for anything through Steam.
Wine is still my fallback for my non-steam stuff.
If game X still doesn’t work, consider running a clean VM, installing only game X and comparing what files were added. Sometimes you can just blind copy the new files into your Wine C: and profit.
Discrete audio cards (like mine) can cause some weird audio behavior, playing with the pulseaudio delay msec variables can help (both in Proton and with Wine).
Oh, and Lutris is a pretty cool little program for organizing games if you haven’t tried it.
I think that covers all my general Linux gaming knowledge :slight_smile:


#26

I admire you AlurianNighthawk for your knowledge of Linux in all its various forms and thankyou for adding a bit of your knowledge to this topic. I as many others would love to abandon the Windows 10 ship for something better. The forced garbage ware and the fact there OS is not adaptive to specific uses and they persist with this one OS system that they want to make usable to every man often the least which happens to be the most common users tablet users, and people that really have no knowledge or interest in computers. Leaving the power Desktop user to suffer from low performance even with high performance machines.


#27

Yeah, I’m not much of a fan of the Metro/Universal Apps. Microsoft really came up with a solution in search of a problem there.

I will say that the trick to switching for me was little by little.

Start by coming up with a task or set of tasks that you think would work well in Linux.
Pick a distro and dual boot with it for a while.
As you customize your desktop to better suit your needs, hotkeys, looks, functionality, you gradually stop wanting to load Windows up. Your experience is better on Linux after all.
From there on it becomes a landslide of, well why can’t this/that work on Linux. Then you work on it, and fail or succeed you always learn a bit more and get a bit more knowledgeable and invested.

atm, the only thing I can think of that might be done better in Windows is audio. That’s mostly because I despise pulseaudio :stuck_out_tongue: It hates me too, so I think our relationship is going well.

These days I’ve become a pure minimalist :slight_smile: . My desktop consists on a picture and a toolbar displaying running applications and the time.
Ctrl + Alt + (number) pulls up my most frequently used apps. Anything that I haven’t set, I load up by hitting Windows Key + R and typing the name. If it has a long name ex. handbrake-gtk, i can type hand hit tab twice to get the second autocomplete choice and enter to run.
So for me, Linux has really become the most convenient :laughing:


#28

Have you ever explored Ubuntu Studio? Supposed to be better at one time for Audio enthusiasts.


#29

Great advise, and I like your minimalist idea. I would like to do the same.:smiley:


#30

Just glancing, but it looks like the main differences are using the low-latency kernel and JACK.

Every few years i change what type of kernel i use. I’m back to using generic at the moment.

I must admit i know jack about JACK :stuck_out_tongue: